Apartments in Franklin Tennessee

Posted under Rental Homes by Marcus Pottea on August 6th, 2013 3:33 pm

rental homes Apartments in Franklin Tennessee

Named after Benjamin Franklin, Money Magazine named the city of Franklin as one of the Best Places to live in 2012. Close to Nashville, Franklin is known for its breathtaking farmland, elite neighborhoods and small town appeal. Backed by its superior shopping and dining, it is swiftly becoming one of the best places to relocate in Tennessee. There are plenty of activities in which to look forward to, everything from the Cool Springs Mall, Franklin Jazz Festival to the annual Pumpkin fest held the end of October. While Franklin TN Apartments brim with single family homes to upscale multimillion dollar homes in the Laurelbrooke neighborhood, apartment living is plentiful and affordable.

Apartment communities in Franklin offer convenience, amenity, style and many are close to schools. Some feature island kitchens, oversized closets, air conditioning, 24-hours emergency maintenance and a washer and dryer in the unit. Depending on the apartment community, you may have to pay extra for a pet so keep this in mind. Carefully think over what you are exactly desire and will need. For instance, if you do not own a car you will want to be within walking distance to your employment, shopping and/or public transportation.

Franklin offers everything from cost efficient to luxury apartment living. Some of the pricier apartments offer a business on-call center and conference rooms, tournament size tennis and golf courts, resort style pools, attached and detached garages, private acres to enjoy some solitude and relaxing walks, yet easy highway and interstate access. For those seeking more economical apartment living, you don’t have to worry about giving up quality and comfort. Less expensive apartments also may offer air conditioning, a dishwasher in unit, laundry facilities, and pool and are even a children’s play area.

Adult senior apartments are also available with the age requirement dependent upon the particular facility (some are available to individuals 55 years and up). Many offer the convenience of being able to walk to shopping and restaurants as well as proximity to medical facilities and Nashville’s exciting nightlife. Some offer the luxury of walking trails and lush landscaping, in addition to meals and housekeeping if needed. Also available are handicap units which provide handicapped parking spaces and units altered to accommodate individuals with disabilities.

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How can I start an acting career?

Posted under Female CEO by Marcus Pottea on October 12th, 2013 2:51 am

I’m a 14 year old female. My dream has always to becom an actress big or small role. Even as an extra would be a start. I’ve been to acting classes but had to quiet because it was the same day I had cheer. I felt like it was pointless anyways. I’m the oldest in the class the rest are 11, 12, and 13 year olds. I felt like it was just a waists of money. We didn’t do much and I don’t even think its a real acting class. I really don’t know how I can start getting into a real acting career. female ceo

A 14-year-old starts with their parents. Child actors have professional careers through the hard work of their parents. It’s a business and there are legal restrictions/requirements for minors. YOUR PARENTS will have to do more than just be "supportive" they will have to be willing to be the CEO of your acting career and make the business decisions related to such a career. See:

http://bizparentz.org/gettingstarted/parentasceo.html

What you do is focus on is learning and growing as an actor. Look into acting classes (different ones than the one you felt wasn’t helpful). Voice and dance lessons can be helpful too. Then audition for what you can in your area – school plays, community theater, church groups, any local productions. Performing with other groups like your cheer group can be helpful too. Other things you can do:

* Check the website for your local film commission and see what opportunities are there. It’s a bit of a long shot, since they’re generally interested in adult actors – but you can always check to see if there’s something appropriate for you.

* Contact local film school and ask how they find actors for student films and then check those resources. Again, it’s a long shot since generally adults are used, but you can try.

* Read plays and scripts – all kinds – keeping an eye out for characters and monologues you want to develop.

* Join a drama club and look into competing in the acting divisions of speech/drama forensic competitions.

* Read articles, websites and books about acting – both the craft of acting and the business end of things. Learn what you can about acting techniques and how the industry works. This can help you figure out if you really want to attempt a professional acting career.

* Get together with friends and make your own shows, movies, web series or other production.

* Keep your grades up at school and embrace learning. You never know when you might use something you learned in school in your acting.

While you do that, your parents need to learn the business end of the industry. Attempting a professional acting career is like running a business and you are the product that has to be marketed and sold. So your AND YOUR PARENTS have to understand how things work. Plus there are a lot of scams and rip offs out there. By educating yourselves, you and your parents can make better, more informed decisions about any professional career you would attempt.

Then when you and your parents are ready, you can decide if it makes sense for you to attempt a professional career at this point (including getting an agent). Remember, you don’t have to have a professional career as minor to have one as an adult. In fact, many child actors have trouble transitioning into adult acting. So it will have to be a business decision about when (and if) you should look for an agent as a minor.

You can always look into an acting school/program for after high school. It’s not required for a professional career, but it can be helpful. Not only do you improve your acting skills and get to work with other people who are as passionate about acting as you hopefully are, but it’s a good way to start to network and make connections in the industry.

Good luck.

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How long should I be in deload mode?

Posted under Breaking the Cycle of Abuse by Marcus Pottea on October 12th, 2013 2:51 am

You probably know what deloading is, it’s when you either take a break from weightlifting or you lower your weights and increase the reps. I haven’t lifted weights since Wednesday. Before that, I was in the gym every day for about 3 months. I know, I was long overdue. I’ve basically heard that you need to do this, or you can’t gain anymore weight. You reach a plateau.

I think that a deload should only be taken when you start feeling really beat up and your lifts start stalling out.

Reason being, deloads as a concept come from really high level lifters and bodybuilders. Those guys have to deload because they are moving major weight, day in day out and the joints take an absolute beating from that kind of weight. The average gym rat just doesn’t subject their body to that kind of abuse, so deloading is not an absolute essential. There are programs out there that advocate a week of deload every cycle, 5/3/1 comes to mind. But if you think about it, doing a deload week once a month costs you a full 3 months of actual training per year. Food for thought.

Personally, I deload specific lifts when they start stalling. If my squat is stalling it doesn’t make sense to back off on my bench press, does it? When I start feeling beat up, I usually do a variation of the exercises I am doing. Sumo deads instead of regular deads; front squats instead of back squats; floor press instead of bench press; etc.

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